Matchbox ~ Carl Perkins – The Beatles ~ Acoustic Cover w/ Epiphone EJ-200CE BK & Bluesharp


(c)1956 Words & Music Carl Perkins
Track 13 on album “Past Masters Vol. 1” (1964)
Arr. stagwolf [acc. to the Beatles recording
~~~
Well, I’m sittin´ here wonderin´ would a matchbox hold my clothes?
Yeah, I’m sittin´ here wonderin´ would a matchbox hold my clothes?
I ain’t got no matches but I got a long way to go..
Well, I’m an ol´ poor boy and I’m a long, long way from home
I’m an ol´ poor boy and I’m a long, long way from home
Guess, I’ll never be happy everything I do is wrong..
Well, if you don’t want my peaches, honey, please don’t shake my tree
If u don’t want my peaches, honey, please don´t shake my tree
I got news for you baby leave me here in misery, all right! [bluesharp
Well, let me be your little dog ´til your big dog comes
Let me be your little dog ´til your big dog comes
When your big dog gets here show him what this little puppy done..
Well, I’m sittin´ here wonderin´ would a matchbox hold my clothes?
Yeah, I’m sittin´ here wonderin´ would a matchbox hold my clothes?
I ain’t got no matches but I got a long way to go..
~~~
Bluesharp key of D
~~~
“Matchbox” is a rockabilly song recorded by Carl Perkins in December 1956. It shares some lyrics with 1920s blues songs by Ma Rainey and Blind Lemon Jefferson. Sam Phillips and Sun Records released the song as the B-side to “Your True Love”. Although only the A-side became a record chart hit in 1957, “Matchbox” is one of Perkins’ best-known recordings. A variety of musicians have recorded the song, including the Beatles. Ma Rainey recorded “Lost Wandering Blues” in Chicago in March 1924. Paramount Records issued it on the standard ten-inch 78 rpm single (no. 12098). Her lyrics include the matchbox as a suitcase reference:
I’m leaving this morning, with my clothes in my hand / I won’t stop to wandering, till I find my man /I’m sitting here wondering’, will a matchbox hold my clothes / I’ve got a sun to beat, I’ll be farther down the road
Three years later, Blind Lemon Jefferson used it for the title of his recording as “Match Box Blues” on March 14, 1927, for Okeh Records in Atlanta, Georgia. Blues author Paul Oliver stated that both Rainey and Jefferson “may have absorbed [the line] from traditional usage.”
Jefferson recorded the song twice more in April 1927 for Paramount Records. Although they contain some differences, they include
I’m sittin’ here wonderin’, will a matchbox hold my clothes (2×) I ain’t got no matches but I still got a long way to go.
Subsequently, the song was recorded by several blues and country swing musicians, such as Lead Belly, Big Bill Broonzy, the Shelton Brothers, and Roy Newman and His Boys.
After “Your True Love”, Carl Perkins’s father Buck suggested that he record “Match Box Blues”. Buck knew only a few lines from the song from the recordings by Jefferson or the Shelton Brothers. As Perkins sang the few words his father had suggested, Jerry Lee Lewis, who was at that time a session piano player at Sun Studios, began a restrained boogie-woogie riff. Carl began picking out a melody on the guitar and improvised lyrics. Perkins maintained that he had never heard Jefferson’s song when he recorded “Matchbox” on December 4, 1956.
The song was published and copyrighted in 1957 in the US with words and music by Carl Lee Perkins by Knox Music/Hill and Range Songs of New York. Jefferson’s song is about a mean spirited woman; Perkins’ is about a lovelorn “poor boy” with limited prospects. Later that day, Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Lewis were all in the Sun Studio with Sam Phillips. The impromptu group formed at this jam session became known as the Million Dollar Quartet. Perkins performed the song on ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee on February 2, 1957.
The Beatles rendition “Matchbox” Song by the Beatles from the album Long Tall Sally (EP) Released June 19, 1964, Recorded June 1, 1964
Genre Rock and roll, rockabilly/Length 1:57 (misprinted as 1:37 on both singles and albums) Label Parlophone/Writer Carl Perkins/Producer George Martin
The Beatles were fans of Perkins and began performing the song circa 1961. Their then-drummer, Pete Best, performed the lead vocals. The only known recording of the song featuring Best singing the song is a live recording. In 1962, John Lennon sang the song during a performance at the Star-Club in Hamburg, Germany; a recording of this exists and was included on Live! at the Star-Club in Hamburg, Germany; 1962.
[from Wiki

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